Neo-Eclectic Post Bop Expressionism

   

Dates: 
Jun 10 2017 - 6:00pm - Sep 9 2017 - 5:00pm

Location: 
AcA's Main Gallery


Dutch Kepler was born in 1943 in Kirksville, Missouri and grew up in an Air Force family on Cape Cod before moving to the south. His B.A. from North Texas State University was followed by an M.F.A from Florida State University.

While teaching Graphic Design at University of Southwestern Louisiana, Dutch took part in one-person and group painting shows in Lafayette, Baton Rouge, Alexandria, New Orleans, Atlanta, Miami Beach, New York City, and Washington DC.

During this tenure he was chosen as a Distinguished Professor by the USL Foundation. Dutch also holds lifetime achievement awards from Acadiana Advertising Federation and Dallas Society of Visual Communications.

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Most of my paintings are landscapes using the figure/ground as building blocks. A horizon line is usually discernable however subtle. The ground becomes expressionistic terrain in juxtaposition with figures. For example, these take the disparate form of trees, camps, musicians...even fish. There is usually a non objective approach used in conjunction with recognizable form.

Color becomes a way to stitch every part together. Energy is often transferred by the movement of water devises such as rivers rising and falling, or snow melting into cascading torrents that flow into oceans. The BP oil spill was a huge source of visual inspiration due to T.V. coverage of machines on the floor of the Gulf of Mexico. In these pieces the horizon line was underwater. The movement of spewage in the water was also ripe for color treatment...an offshoot of this disaster created the imagery of genetic mutations.

I never paint outdoors. And I never paint interiors as subject matter...a sax player as a subject would be placed in a landscape format. It is rare that I look at a still picture to describe figure/ground. I have this internal understanding about what’s out there and the visual approach needed to convey the pictorial plane.

— Dutch Kepler, January 14, 2015